News & Media

NSF Funding for an integrative model of decision-making

The lab has recently received funding from the National Science Foundation to develop an integrative model of decision-making in an immersive shooting simulator. This is in collaboration with Taosheng Liu and Tim Pleskac.

 

Are Black Americans shot more than we would expect?

Are Black Americans more likely to be shot than White Americans? It depends on your assumptions about the nature of police use of deadly force. Click HERE to be taken to a webpage answering this question, intended for a non-academic audience.

Our lab's recent work on deadly force decisions

Click HERE for a summary of our lab's recent work on police officers' deadly force decisions. This page summarizes our recent experimental laboratory work and our analyses of real-world deadly force data.

Learn more about Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology!

Kai Jonas narrates this informative video about Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology, the field's peer-review preregistration journal. Click here to watch the video.

Select Media Mentions:

Research on police deadly force decisions:

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Research on power poses:

Research on coalitions and defensive threat behavior:

 

 

 

 

Research on priming and replication:

Our most recent work can be found HERE showing the race of an officer does not relate to the race of a citizen fatally shot. Instead, violent crime rates relate to the race of a person fatally shot by the police.

See HERE for a non-academic summary of this work.

Officer Race and Fatal Shootings of Minority Citizens

Call

 

517-355-0203
 

Email

 

cesario [at] msu.edu

Address

255 Psychology Building

Michigan State University

East Lansing, MI 48824

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants 1230281 and 1756092. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

 

The opinions expressed here are the views of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of Michigan State University.